Skip to main content

National Agriculture Policy

The first ever National Agriculture Policy was announced in 2000. The policy seeks to actualise the vast untapped growth potential of Indian agriculture, strengthen rural infrastructure to support faster agricultural development, promote value addition, accelerate the growth of agro business, create employment in rural areas, secure a fair standard of living for the farmers and agricultural workers and their families, discourage migration to urban areas and face the challenges arising out of economic liberalisation and globalisation. Over the next two decades, the policy aims to attain:

  1. A growth rate in excess of four per cent per annum in the agriculture sector.
  2. The policy seeks to promote technically sound, economically viable, environmentally nondegrading, and socially acceptable use of country’s natural resources – land, water and genetic endowment to promote sustainable development of agriculture.
  3. The use of bio-technologies will be promoted for evolving plants which consume less water, are drought resistant, pest resistant, contain more nutrition, give higher yields and are environmentally safe.
  4. Conservation of bio-resources through their ex situ preservation in Gene Banks, as also in situ conservation in their natural habitats through bio-diversity parks, etc., will receive a high priority to prevent depletion of bio-diversity.
  5. Balanced and conjunctive use of bio-mass, organic and inorganic fertilizers and controlled use of agro chemicals through integrated nutrients and pest management (INM & IPM) will be promoted. A regionally differentiated strategy will be pursued, taking into account the agronomic, climatic and environmental conditions to realise the full growth potential of every region.
  6. Special attention will be given to development of new crop varieties, particularly of food crops, with higher nutritional value.
  7. A major thrust will be given to development of rainfed and irrigated horticulture, floriculture, roots and tubers, plantation crops, aromatic and medicinal plants, bee-keeping and sericulture for augmenting food supply, promoting exports and generating employment in the rural areas.
  8. Development of animal husbandry, poultry, dairying and aqua-culture will receive a high priority in the efforts for diversifying agriculture, increasing animal protein availability in the food basket and for generating exportable surpluses.
  9. An integrated approach to marine and inland fisheries, designed to promote sustainable aquaculture practices, will be adopted.
  10. The regionalisation of agricultural research based on identified agro-climatic zones will be accorded high priority. Application of frontier sciences like bio-technology, remote sensing technologies, pre-and post-harvest technologies, energy saving technologies, technology for environmental protection through national research system as well as proprietary research will be encouraged.
  11. The research and extension linkages will be strengthened to improve quality and effectiveness of research and extension system.
  12. Adequate and timely supply of quality inputs such as seeds, fertilizers, plant protection chemicals, bio-pesticides, agricultural machinery and credit at reasonable rates to farmers will be the endeavour of the Government.
  13. The Government will endeavour to create a favourable economic environment for increasing capital formation and farmer’s own investments by removing distortions in the incentive regime for  agriculture, improving the terms of trade with manufacturing sectors and bringing about external and domestic market reforms.
  14. Rural electrification will be given a high priority as a prime mover for agricultural development. The quality and availability of electricity supply will be improved and the demand of the agriculture sector will be met adequately in a reliable and cost effective manner.
  15. Bridging the gap between irrigation potential created and utilised, completion of all on-going projects, restoration and modernisation of irrigation infrastructure including drainage, evolving and implementing an integrated plan of augmentation and management of national water resources will receive special attention for augmenting the availability and use of irrigation water.
  16. Emphasis will be laid on development of marketing infrastructure and techniques of preservation, storage and transportation with a view to reducing post-harvest losses and ensuring a better return to the grower.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

How to identify Calculator is Programmable or Non-Programmable Calculator ?

Some competitive examinations allow the use of a calculator but may permit to use of only a calculator of the non-programmable type. Calculators that are NOT programmable: This is what a non-programmable calculator looks like. List of non-programmable calculators of some famous brands like  Casio , Sharp , Texas Instruments , Hawlett Packard . Calculators that are programmable: Programmable calculators can automatically carry out a sequence of operations under the control of a stored program, much like a computer. Examples of the programmable calculator are at the top picture. These calculators runs on a Computer Algebra System (CAS). A CAS helps to make certain difficult algebraic functions automatic and less tedious. As you can see, these calculators also have graphing capabilities. A calculator with graphing capabilities is most likely to be programmable. The easy way to tell if the calculator has graphing capabilities is by looking at the larger screen than would

Flood and Drought Affected Areas in India

In India, the regional and seasonal distribution of rainfall is uneven. On the one hand, Jaislamer receives less than 9 cm of annual rainfall and on the other hand, Mawsynram, near Cherapunji, receives more than 1140 cm of annual rainfall. Similarly, most of the rainfall in India is received in the months of June, July, August and September. Generally, variations in the amount of rainfall are found more in the regions where the rainfall is uneven and less and these regions are more affected by droughts. Droughts Drought is an abnormally long dry season, which creates a clear imbalance in the availability of water. both, the vagaries of monsoon and dominant factor, which cause drought and drought like conditions. The irrigation commission, on the basis of the amount of rainfall and its variability, has divided the drought affected areas into two types: Drought Areas: Drought areas have annual rainfall less than 50 cm and variability is more than 25%. Under these areas are in

The Advent of European Companies in India

In 1453, land routes were blocked by Ottoman Turks. So, new sea routes discovered by the Europeans to promote their business. Colombus of Spain discovered America where as in 1498, Vasco-da-Gama of Portugal discovered India. He came to India via Cape of Good Hope (Africa). First of all, Vasco-da-Gama reached to Calicut (Kerla or Kozhicode) where Zamorin ruler welcomed his arrival. The Portugese soon established political power along the west coast of India. he was succeeded by Captain General Alfonso de Albuquerque who conquered Goa in 1510. Sequence of Arrivals:- Company Year H.Q./Capital Potugese East Indian company (Formed by Vasco-da-Gama) 1498 Cochin (1510-30), Goa (1530-1961) Dutch East India Company 1602 East coast; Coromandal, Pulicut, Bengal English East India Company 1608 West coast: Surat, Bombay east coast: Coromandal, Masulipatanam, Madras. French East India Company (Formed by Colbert) 1664 Surat (1668-73), Pondi